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Sass Layout in 2013 and the Future of Susy

The web is littered with grid systems and ‘frameworks’ that force your code & design into narrowly defined patterns. Even the most semantic of us have had to push specialized techniques in order to create a usable syntax.

But Sass has come a long way, and I’m convinced that it’s time for something new.

What if you had a layout system that bends completely to the needs of your site? What if you could use one unified syntax for handling responsive layouts of any kind? What if you had a modular system that let you mix-and-match to customize for every site, and change your output with simple extensions?

The web is littered with grid systems and ‘frameworks’ that force your code & design into narrowly defined patterns. Even the most semantic of us have had to push specialized techniques in order to create a usable syntax.

But Sass has come a long way, and I’m convinced that it’s time for something new.

What if you had a layout system that bends completely to the needs of your site? What if you could use one unified syntax for handling responsive layouts of any kind? What if you had a modular system that let you mix-and-match to customize for every site, and change your output with simple extensions?

I’m excited to announce Susy Next, a joint project from the creators of Singularity, Salsa, Breakpoint, and Susy. We’ll be working together to design and build a unified layout system under the Susy name.

Please welcome the Susy Next team:

All of us are passionate designer/developers, with a love for Sass & CSS. We’re excited to build a layout syntax that spans existing frameworks, techniques, and systems. We hope you’ll get involved, and help make it a community project. Stay tuned!

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