OddBird

Meet the Birds…

Miriam Suzanne

Co-Founder & Project Manager

Miriam leads the OddBird process, working with clients and users to set priorities and find solutions to their unique problems. She is a user-experience expert, and a pioneer of modern CSS techniques – member of the Sass core team, and creator of the popular Susy and True libraries. Miriam is a teacher and open-web advocate for Mozilla Developer, staff writer for CSS-Tricks, co-author of SitePoint’s Jump Start Sass, and internationally known conference speaker, winning “Best of” CSS Dev Conf in 2017. She is also a multimedia artist with extensive experience in theatre, writing, music, and visual art.

Featured Talks

CSS Is Rad

Learn to build resilient cross-platform sites without waiting for universal feature support.

User Unfriendly

A project-manager’s reflections on human-centered problem-solving, client communication, and agile web development.

Planning Your Web Project

A non-technical guide for taking your project from concept to launch, without ever losing sight of the goals.

Featured Workshops

Featured Videos

Event Schedule

CSS Is Rad at Smashing Conf Austin

on in Austin, TX

Depending who you ask, CSS is either awesome or broken. CSS is not a programming language, unless it is. CSS is too simple and entirely too difficult. CSS is weird – not like other languages, and not like print design either, but trapped in a strange middle ground with unique rules and constraints.

Upcoming Appearances

Speaking History

Open Source Contributions

core developer

creator

co-creator



Embracing the Universal Web

CSS-Tricks asked a number of web builders the same question…

What about building websites has you interested this year?

There are constantly new features appearing in browsers – from subgrid to variable fonts to better developer tools. It’s a really great time to be re-thinking everything we know about design on the web. Responsive design has served us well over the years, but it’s still rooted in the limitations of the web from 2010. Ten years later, we’re able to create more “Intrinsic” designs (a term coined by Jen Simmons) and hopefully re-think some “best practices” that are now holding us back.

Read more on CSS-Tricks

Edit your CSS Shapes with the Shape Path Editor

For quick visual adjustments directly on the page

Have you ever wanted to create more interesting shapes on the web, or flow text around the details of an image? Shape paths can be hard to code without a visual reference, but Firefox provides a shape editor to make it quick and clear.

Read more

Use new selectors responsibly with selector queries

Just in time for Selectors Level 4!

Firefox 69 was the first to implement selector feature queries, but other browsers are following suit. I’ll show you how it works, and how to start using this new feature query right away.

Read more

How do you wrap long words in CSS?

None of the solutions are perfect, but we have some options

Horizontal text overflow has always been difficult to manage on the web. The default visible overflow is designed to make sure content remains accessible no matter the size of a containing box, but it’s not our only option.

Read more

Scroll Snap in CSS

Without any JavaScript or “scrolljacking”

When we’re scrolling down a page, or through a gallery of images, snap-targets can help guide us from one section or image to the next. In the past, developers have used JavaScript to hijack scrolling, but now we can manage scroll alignment directly in CSS with only a few lines of code.

Read more

Inner & Outer Values of the Display Property

Allow us to be more explicit & expressive about layouts

The display property has been in CSS from the beginning, handling everything from block and inline boxes to list-items and full layout systems like flexbox or grid. Now the display syntax is getting an upgrade to match its multiple uses.

Read more

Why isn’t this CSS doing anything?

Have you ever set a width in CSS, and… nothing happens?

There are a number of property & value combinations that can lead to CSS being inactive, and now Firefox will tell you why. Open the developer tools, and look for the greyed-out property with an info-box on hover.

Read more

Faster Layouts with CSS Grid

And subgrid, landing on Dec 3

CSS Grid has been available in most major browsers since early 2017, and it makes web layout more powerful than ever before. But complex-looking new syntax (line-names! grid-areas! minmax! fit-content! fr units!) and missing IE11 support can make it scary to many developers.

Read more

CSS-Tricks: Introducing Sass Modules

Sass recently launched a major new feature you might recognize from other languages: a module system. The new syntax will replace @import with @use and @forward – a big step forward for making Sass partials (one of the language’s most used features) more readable, performant, and safe. This article goes into detail, but you can also read our “Sass Modules, a Primer” article for the quick introduction.

Read more on CSS-Tricks

What does revert do in CSS?

And how is it different from unset or initial?

I’ve often used initial and unset in my CSS – global keywords that can be applied to any property. The difference is small, but important: unset allows inheritance, while initial does not. But then Firefox implemented revert and I was confused – how is this one different from the others?!

Read more

Miriam presenting

Resilient Web Training & Consulting

Take full advantage of the universal web, and reduce maintenance over the long term with resilient HTML, CSS, and JS systems. OddBird provides custom consulting and in-depth trainings on front-end architecture and workflow – from advanced HTML/CSS to integrated design systems, component libraries, testing, and documentation.

Contact us for 1-3 day workshops with Miriam Suzanne, or custom web app creation with our team of Python, UX, and front-end experts.

Schedule a call with Miriam